Thursday, November 16, 2017

Double-digit increase in anti-White hate crime from 2015 to 2016

From recently released FBI hate crime statistics, we find the number of white hate crime (HC) offenders declined by 3.0% from 2015 to 2016 while the number of black hate crime offenders grew by 15.2% over the same time period.

Similarly, the number of anti-White hate crime incidents increased 14.9% between 2015 and 2016 while the number of anti-Black hate crime incidents marginally decreased by 0.3% over the same time period.

HC offenders who are...Δ'15-'16
White-3.0%
Black+15.2%

Incidents of...Δ'15-'16
Anti-White HC+14.9%
Anti-Black HC-0.3%

Trump is obviously to blame here. All the supporters he brought out to rallies or just around town in their MAGA gear were fostering an oppressive atmosphere of hate. It is poetic justice, then, that these haters turned out to be the victims of the hatred they so hatefully released unto the world!

Parenthetically, in absolute numbers blacks are heavily overrepresented both as perpetrators of and victims of hate crimes. The sliver of crime with the designated "hate" prefix is politically charged, primarily serving as a way of making black criminality and victimology appear much more sympathetic towards blacks than figures on total criminality do.

Comprising far less than 1% of all crime, hate crimes tell us little about the actual nature of criminality in the country. The directional changes are worth noting, however.

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Epigonian aesthetics

Commenter Candide III:
Please, Anepigone, please don't do this to graphs. Yes, the numbers are there, but visual impressions count, and your graph, with the bottom at 40%, gives the misleading impression that the Mohammedans' support is only half of even blacks' (never mind that all this is self-reported and not revealed-preference) when really the ratio of the largest to the smallest bar is less than two. It's bad enough that everyone else does this with the small print, but Carlylean veracity is the only way for us.
Here is the graph he's referring to:


The sentiment is well received. The main reason it was presented as such in this particular case is because the questions considered were dichotomous ones without "don't know", "no opinion", etc as possible responses. To have visually expressed this across a fully displayed y-axis would've looked like this:


The numbers are all plainly included so it's not much of a bait-and-switch. If the worry is that it'll leave a skewed impression for those who don't give it more than a glance, well, I'm not writing in a scientific publication and I do have a subjective position on just about everything that is posted on.

Here are a couple of other ways the same data could've been presented. This one possibly would've been more objectionable (it's not uncommon for polling outfits to restrict the upper end of the y-axis):


And this one definitely would have been:


That it's a coin toss as to whether or not a Muslim living in America thinks controversial speakers should be permitted to speak in public and that 1-in-3 NAMs believes they should be precluded from doing so is quite jolting for a lot of people, and my intention is to design the graphic accordingly.

GSS variables used: SPKRAC, SPKHOMO, SPKCOM, SPKATH, SPKMIL, RACECEN1(1)(2)(4-10), HISPANIC(1)(2-50), RELIG(3)(9), POLVIEWS(1-3)(4)(5-7)

Monday, November 13, 2017

Free speech and the Coalition of the Fringes

The following graph shows free speech index scores by selected demographic characteristics.

The index is a simple average of the percentage of respondents who said that five different categories of controversial advocates should be allowed to speak publicly. The higher the score, the more supportive of free speech the group is. The five categories are pretty well balanced politically with three on the 'far left' (atheists, homosexuals, and communists) and two on the 'far right' (racists and militarists). For contemporary relevance, all responses are from 2000 onward (N = 11,930):


Moderate and conservative whites are grouped together because their scores are so similar (73.6 and 74.8, respectively) that separating them out unnecessarily cluttered up the graph.

The first amendment is the Coalition of the Fringes' thermal exhaust port. That's where it will be blown up.

Blacks shouting down the ACLU with chants of "liberalism is white supremacy"; Bernie Sanders being shut down by a couple of sassy land whales in Seattle; BEANERs DREAMERs humiliating Nancy Pelosi at a televised speaking event; countless numbers of liberal academics being swarmed and interrogated by miscreant mobs of blacks and browns--these incidents and others like them should be mentioned whenever the opportunity presents itself.

GSS variables used: SPKRAC, SPKHOMO, SPKCOM, SPKATH, SPKMIL, RACECEN1(1)(2)(4-10), HISPANIC(1)(2-50), RELIG(3)(9), POLVIEWS(1-3)(4)(5-7)

Sunday, November 12, 2017

Like a lead balloon

The following graph comes from data from a Reuters-Ipsos poll asking about support for the Republican congressional tax reform plan. The poll has been running since mid-October, so the results are presumably mostly in response to the House plan rather than the one from the Senate, which came out last week (N = 4,390):


Inspiring.

The graph only shows "support" responses. The other two--"oppose" and "don't know"--are not shown. Thirty percent of the total population falls into the latter of the two responses that are not shown. If they were discounted, public opinion wouldn't look as bad as it does at first blush in the graph presented above.

It wouldn't look as bad, but it'd still look bad. Among those who either "support" or "oppose" among the total population, the plan gets 38.9% support to 61.1% opposition.

However it's presented, the odds of passage are long.

This would not appear to be a political hill worth dying on. Unless the intention was to ensure the Stupid Party moniker remained alive and well, that is.

Meanwhile, the WALL remains 0% complete.